Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Sathya Sai: Contemplation of death is foundation of spiritual discipline; without it, man will identify with false sense-pleasure world

From discourse of Bhagavan Sri Sathya Sai Baba, http://www.sssbpt.info/ssspeaks/volume10/sss10-15.pdf, which seems to have been delivered on a GuruPurnina day, 18th July 1970:

GURU POURNAMI is sacred for many reasons: this day, the seeker who suffers from identification with the false objective world is initiated into the reality of the 'unseen motivator' within him; this day; those who have no urge to tread the spiritual path are inspired to seek the bliss which that path will confer; this day, aspirants are helped to achieve the consciousness of the One, which is known by many Names and through many Forms, in various languages and lands.
...
The contemplation of death is the very foundation of spiritual discipline. Without it, man is
certain to fall into falsehood, pursuing the objects of sense-pleasure, and trying to accumulate
material, worldly riches. Death is no ominous calamity; it is a step into the auspicious brightness
beyond. It is inescapable; it cannot be bribed away, adjourned by certificates of good conduct, or
testimonials from the great. Once born, death is the inevitable end. But, it is possible to escape
birth and thereby, escape death. For, birth is the consequence of karma. Do Karma which breeds
no consequence, no after-effects which have to be lived through---and you need not be born
again. Engage in activity, as duty; or engage in activity, as 'offering of worship to God'---then,
such activity will breed no after-effects. This problem of escaping death, achieving immortality,
Amrithathwam, is the very core of inquiry.
--- end extracts from Bhagavan discourse ---

Ravi: Enlightening words from Bhagavan!
I am reminded of the term, 'smashana vairagyam', meaning 'crematorium dispassion/detachment'. At the crematorium as one sees the lifeless body of a loved friend/relative, after appropriate rituals, get consigned to fire, one sure wonders about the permanence of worldly life and its real value. One wonders how much importance one should give to worldly things. It is a sobering experience and, if taken in the right spirit, great opportunity for learning (with death being the teacher of it being a great truth of worldly life) which can put one more firmly on the quest of experiencing the eternal spiritual life even when involved in worldly life.

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